New Shows on Netflix

TV Lists Netflix
Share Tweet Submit Pin
New Shows on Netflix

Netflix is releasing so many original new TV series, it can be easy to lose track of the latest shows. We’ve compiled a running list of the all the biggest new Netflix original shows and exclusive releases from the streaming giant’s partners, and we’ll continue to update it as new shows get added. We’ve skipped reality shows and focused on recent narrative series.

As always, some of these new Netflix series we recommend heartily and others aren’t quite our cup of streaming tea, but there’s definitely something for everyone below, especially if you don’t mind subtitles. Here are 12 of the biggest new shows at Netflix released in the past three months.

1. The Watcher

the-watcher.jpg
Netflix Release Date: October 13, 2022
Creators: Ryan Murphy, Ian Brennan
Stars: Evan Peters, Niecy Nash, Molly Ringwald, Michael Learned, Richard Jenkins
Genre: Crime Drama
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

In this limited series, Bobby Cannavale and Naomi Watts move into their dream home. But, you know, dreams are never what they seem—especially in a Ryan Murphy series. Fresh off her Emmy win, Jennifer Coolidge stars as real estate agent Karen Calhoun. Netflix is going all in on the promotion for the series including a Zillow listing and a video tour of the house, hosted by Coolidge! —Amy Amatangelo


2. The Midnight Club

midnight-club.jpg
Netflix Release Date: October 7, 2022
Creators: Leah Fong, Mike Flanagan
Stars: Iman Benson, Isby Rigney, Ruth Codd, Heather Langenkamp, Annarah Cymone, Chris Sumpter, Adia, Aya Furukawa
Genre: Horror, Drama
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

Horror stories (and no small amount of other genre tales) have long been used as metaphors to discuss difficult real-life subject matter. And much like creator Mike Flanagan’s other popular Netflix Hauntings, his latest effort, The Midnight Club, is less interested in horror for its own sake than it is in using the genre as a vehicle to tell larger stories about life, death, and faith. On the surface, The Midnight Club seems like a fun enough diversion for spooky season—it’s got some pretty decent jumpscares and dark themes spread across its ten episodes, along with a bunch of campfire-style scary stories, and even a weirdo cult thrown in for good measure. But at the end of the day, this show isn’t a murder mystery or a slasher flick. It’s not even a ghost story, at least not in the way you might think it would be. Instead, The Midnight Club is a surprisingly thoughtful rumination on what it means to die, although its deeper truths come wrapped in the bright candy coating of a teen drama. The series follows the story of the members of the titular Midnight Club, a variety of teens with different ethnicities and backgrounds who all have two things in common: They each have a terminal illness and they’ve decided to spend their last days at the very spooky-looking Brightcliffe Manor. At its heart, The Midnight Club proves once again that Flanagan understands one simple truth about horror: The things we’re most afraid of are often connected to, and driven by, the things we most long for. In a world where kids can die of cancer before they ever even make it to prom, what do we need monsters for, really? —Lacy Baugher Milas


3. Glitch

glitch.jpg
Netflix Release Date: October 7, 2022
Creators: Gin Han-sai, Roh Deok
Stars: Lee Dong-hwi, Jeon Bae-soo, Ryu Kyung-soo
Genre: Sci-Fi
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

Netflix’s latest K-drama offering, genre series Glitch—much like the conspiracy theories that drive its plot—is not what it initially appears to be. When we first meet thirtysomething Jihyo (Vincenzo’s Jeon Yeobin), she has a reliable job and a dependable boyfriend, but she’s sleepwalking through life, using most of her energy to pretend she doesn’t see aliens—or, more accurately, one alien in particular: a baseball helmet-wearing Little Green Man who looks like he just stepped off the backlot from X-Files episode “The Unnatural,” and who Jihyo has been seeing since ever she was a bespectacled, UFO-obsessed tween with a point-and-shoot camera. When Jihyo’s boyfriend, Sihyuk, disappears, our protagonist is pulled back into the obsession she thought she left behind. This show is odd and unpredictable, centered around female friendship and religious, alien-worshiping cults. I tell you these things because, when I say the show is also kind of boring, I want you to know how much I still admire that it zigs when most TV shows are zagging. There’s so much potential in this beautifully directed show, which is not like anything on contemporary American or Korean TV. —Kayti Burt


4. The Empress

the-empress.jpg
Netflix Release Date: September 29, 2022
Creators: Katharina Eyssen, Lena Stahl
Stars: Devrim Lingnau, Philip Froissant, Melika Foroutan, Johannes Nussbaum
Genre: Historical Drama
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

This six-episode German period drama follows the life of Empress Elisabeth of Austria as she falls in love and marries Emperor Franz Joseph in the mid 19th Century. As the rebellious young girl moves into the palace in Austria, she must navigate a court that includes Franz’s younger ambitious brother.


5. Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story

dahmer.jpg
Netflix Release Date: September 21, 2022
Creators: Ryan Murphy, Ian Brennan
Stars: Evan Peters, Niecy Nash, Molly Ringwald, Michael Learned, Richard Jenkins
Genre: Crime Drama
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

Between 1978 and 1991, Jeffrey Dahmer killed and dismembered 17 men and boys. Now he’s also the subject of a Ryan Murphy-led 10-part biopic limited series on Netflix. Evan Peters stars as the infamous serial killer.


6. Cyberpunk: Edgerunners

cyberpunk-edge.jpg
Netflix Release Date: September 13, 2022
Creators: Rafa? Jaki, Mike Pondsmith
Stars: Kenn, Aoi Y?ki, Hiroki T?chi, Michiko Kaiden, Takako Honda, Wataru Takagi, Tomoyo Kurosawa
Genre: Anime, Sci-Fi
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

Cyberpunk 2077 launched to widespread disapproval, drawing criticism for feeling unfinished and falling short of its massive ambitions. But despite its infamy, the game has recently catapulted back into the spotlight thanks to a Netflix anime from Studio Trigger and CD Projekt, Cyberpunk: Edgerunners. Edgerunners is an unabashedly juvenile splatterfest, a culmination of Trigger’s ability to produce iconic imagery that elevates familiar genre beats through raw, hyperbolic cuts of animation. It’s brash, loud, and as subtle as the explosions of gunfire, gore, and garish colors that fill its frames. Perhaps most importantly, the chaotic violence is used to deliver heart-wrenching turns as the show plays with the fates of its strangely likable cast. While this crime caper may not break from the core issues of this franchise or cyberpunk more broadly, it manages to hit more than a few emotional highs and look very good in the process. The story follows disaffected high schooler David Martinez who, after experiencing personal tragedy, meets a mysterious hacker named Lucy and falls in with her crew in the dystopian sprawl of Night City, where the videogame and table-top RPG take place. From here, David slips deeper into a world of constant brutality, corporate warfare, and deceit as this doomed metropolis threatens to swallow him whole. Cyberpunk: Edgerunners accomplishes what it sets out to do, breathing life into this somewhat played-out genre through a feast of aesthetic highlights and genuine character moments. It is filled with grotesque violence meant to provoke, but there is just enough self-reflection on its causes and effects to grant appeal beyond the edgy teen demographic. And frankly, whenever it goes guns-blazing, it’s hard to look away from its inventive and gnarly animation. Edgerunners conveys the tragedy of Night City with crushing melodrama, coming across as something the bleary-eyed insomniac protagonist of a cyberpunk novel would watch on a flickering screen at 3 AM. —Elijah Gonzalez


7. The Imperfects

the-imperfects.jpg
Netflix Release Date: September 8, 2022
Creators: Shelley Eriksen, Dennis Heaton
Stars: Italia Ricci, Morgan Taylor Campbell, Rhianna Jagpal, Iñaki Godoy, Rhys Nicholson, Kyra Zagorsky
Genre: Sci-fi
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

This new Canadian series follows victims of a science experiment gone terribly awry as they seek a cure for their new monstrous symptoms.


8. Devil in Ohio

devil-ohio.jpg
Netflix Release Date: September 2, 2022
Creator: Daria Polatin
Stars: Emily Deschanel, Xaria Dotson, Madeleine Arthur, Sam Jaeger, Gerardo Celasco
Genre: Thriller
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

Technically a work of fiction although it’s inspired by a true story, Devil in Ohio’s neck hair-raising suspense thriller is about a teenage daughter of a hospital psychiatrist who comes to find that her mom has brought home one of her patients: another girl, and one who claims to have escaped from a cult. Netflix is turning the book into a limited series with Emily Deschanel playing the shrink mom, Dr. Suzanne Mathis, and Xaria Dotson playing her daughter, Jules. Madeleine Arthur plays their new houseguest, Mae. —Whitney Friedlander


9. Partner Track

partner-track.jpg
Netflix Release Date: August 26, 2022
Creator: Georgia Lee
Stars: Arden Cho, Alexandra Turshen, Bradley Gibson, Dominic Sherwood, Rob Heaps, Nolan Gerard Funk, Matthew Rauch, Roby Attal
Genre: Romance, Drama
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

Based on Helen Wan’s novel, this series amps up the soapy drama as a high-powered attorney (Arden Cho) tries to prioritize her career while her personal life threatens to get in the way.


10. Mo

mo-netflix.jpg
Netflix Release Date: August 24, 2022
Creator: Mohammed Amer, Ramy Youssef
Stars: Mohammed Amer, Teresa Ruiz, Omar Elba, Farah Bsieso
Genre: Comedy, Drama
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

With its slice-of-life, vérité style that’s rooted in the sights and sounds of Mo’s actual Houston community, the series deftly stitches together the varied patchwork of what his American existence looks like. Despite being the youngest of the siblings, the fictionalized Mo Najjar has taken to heart his father’s edict to take care of them, and Amer is able to portray the weight of how that responsibility has seeped into every pore of his character because he’s lived the same life. The codeine addiction in the show is clearly one of the first crutches Najjar has had in two decades of trying to be everything everyone needs him to be, despite being kneecapped by an immigration system that doesn’t allow him to live up to his full potential. Even with his positive outside countenance, in Mo Amer makes sure we feel the ripple of failure that simmers under Najjar’s skin. As they say, inside every comedian is a sad clown, and Amer taps into that with such authenticity by revealing his unique and personal story so poignantly over the course of the show. —Tara Bennett


11. The Sandman

sandman.jpg
Netflix Release Date: August 5, 2022
Creator: Neil Gaiman, David S. Goyer, Allan Heinberg
Stars: Tom Sturridge, Boyd Holbrook, Patton Oswalt, Vivienne Acheampong, Gwendoline Christie, Charles Dance, Jenna Coleman, David Thewlis, Stephen Fry
Genre: Fantasy
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

For decades now, it’s been a generally accepted bit of conventional entertainment wisdom that Neil Gaiman’s landmark series The Sandman was essentially unadaptable. Though various interested parties have been attempting to figure out how to bring some version of this story to the screen since the early 1990s, they all eventually found themselves broken on the rocks of the comic’s epic scope, complex lore, and constantly shifting genres. A story that is essentially about telling stories, The Sandman features nods to classical literature, art, and folk tales from around the world. Its cast of characters includes anthropomorphic immortals, monsters, demons, talking animals, real-life historical figures, and literal nightmares, and its narrative encompasses life, death, and everything in between. (Sometimes literally!) I was ready to hate the heck out of Netflix’s lush, extremely expensive-looking new 10-episode adaptation of Gaiman’s seminal work, if only because I’ve spent over half my life waiting for someone to do a live-action version of this story and getting my heart repeatedly broken in the process. And to be clear, Netflix’s The Sandman isn’t perfect. But, goodness, it’s so, so much more than I ever thought I’d get. Fans of the original will inevitably find things to nitpick—and to be fair, there are some fairly significant changes to the source material—but the heart of the comics story is here, with many scenes that look as though they were lifted straight from the pages of specific issues, and an incredible ensemble cast that manages to embrace even the weirdest of twists with open hearts. Welcome to the Dreaming, world. —Lacy Baugher Milas


12. Uncoupled

uncoupled.jpg
Netflix Release Date: July 29, 2022
Creators: Darren Star, Jeffrey Richman
Stars: Neil Patrick Harris, Tisha Campbell, Brooks Ashmanskas, Emerson Brooks
Genre: Romance, Drama
Rating: TV-14

Watch on Netflix

In Uncoupled, we follow successful New York City real estate agent Michael Lawson (Neil Patrick Harris), who has been with his partner Colin (Tuc Watkins) for 17 years. Their seemingly perfect life is upended when Colin unceremoniously moves out on the night of his surprise 50th birthday party. With fabulous NYC locations as its backdrop, plus bouncy, playful theme music and frequent restaurant meals for its characters, Uncoupled is a 2022 version of Sex and the City swapping in gay men for straight women. The comparisons to the beloved HBO series are all right there for the taking. Michael, the show’s Carrie, is devastated and left to figure out what his life is without Colin, easily the show’s Big. Michael has his best friends Billy (Emerson Brooks) and Stanley (Brooks Ashmanskas), as well as his business partner Suzanne (Tisha Campbell), to help him navigate his newly single life. Stanley is an art dealer like Charlotte and unlucky in love like Miranda. Billy, who always has a new and much younger boyfriend on his arm, is the show’s Samantha, along with Suzanne who provides sly bon mots like, “They came after him like the Scientologists came after Leah,” and “It’s a little angrier in person… kind of like Ellen DeGeneres.” They’re all helping Michael figure out a dating world that has changed a lot in the nearly two decades he’s been off the market. And just like that, the television comedy of the summer is here. —Amy Amatangelo