New Shows on Netflix

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New Shows on Netflix

Netflix is releasing so many original new TV series, it can be easy to lose track of the latest shows. We’ve compiled a running list of the all the biggest new Netflix original shows and exclusive releases from the streaming giant’s partners, and we’ll continue to update it as new shows get added. We’ve skipped reality shows and focused on recent narrative series.

As always, some of these new Netflix series we recommend heartily and others aren’t quite our cup of streaming tea, but there’s definitely something for everyone below, especially if you don’t mind subtitles. Here are 12 of the biggest new shows at Netflix released in the past two months.

1. The Pentaverate

pentaverate.jpg Netflix Release Date: May 5, 2022
Creator: Mike Myers
Stars: Mike Myers, Ken Jeong, Keegan-Michael Key, Debi Mazar, Richard McCabe, Jennifer Saunders, Lydia West
Genre: Comedy

Watch on Netflix

Is the world ready for the Mike Myers comeback? Netflix obviously thinks so. They’re premiering the comedian’s new TV show, The Pentaverate, on May 5, marking Myers’ return to the kind of character-based comedy he became known for on Saturday Night Live and in the Austin Powers movies. The show’s Illuminati-inspired concept features Myers playing several roles—one of which is Shep Gordon, the real-life music manager of acts like Alice Cooper and Blondie who Myers directed a documentary about in 2013. This is the biggest comedy project Myers has worked on since his disastrous 2008 film The Love Guru, give or take a Shrek sequel. After that movie bombed he didn’t pop up with a new character for almost a decade, when he hosted a short-lived revival of The Gong Show as the fictional British comedian Tommy Maitland. His commitment to wearing wigs and prosthetics remains alive in The Pentaverate, where he’ll play eight characters in total, including a few beyond the titular secret society like a news anchor and also a couple of different conspiracy theorists devoted to exposing the sinister cabal—although are you still a conspiracy theorist if your theories are true? Along the way there’ll be a healthy amount of the low-brow humor Myers is known for, as well as the “ain’t I a stinker” mugging he loves to indulge in. If you were hoping Mike Myers would still be Mike Myers even after basically taking over a decade off, you can rest easy, it seems. During the six-episode series, Myers will be joined by a cast including Lydia West, Rob Lowe, Ken Jeong, Keegan-Michael Key, Jennifer Saunders, Debi Mazar, Richard McCabe, Maria Menounous, and the voice of Jeremy Irons, who narrates. —Garrett Martin


2. Heartstopper

heartstopper.jpg Netflix Release Date: April 22, 2022
Creator: Alice Oseman
Stars: Kit Connor, Joe Locke, William Gao, Yasmin Finney, Corinna Brown, Kizzy Edgell, Olivia Coleman, Stephen Fry
Genre: Romantic Drama
Rating: TV-14

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In the LGBTQ+ teen coming-of-age canon, a scene in which a closeted character googles “am i gay?” in the midst of a sexuality crisis has become a staple. This familiar moment of self-questioning is present in Heartstopper, but not in the way we are used to. It’s not the protagonist hesitantly spelling out G-A-Y, but the love interest. This subtle but meaningful change in Netflix’s eight-part show, derived from creator and writer Alice Oseman’s Tumblr-originated webcomics turned graphic novels, is indicative of the fresh breath of air that Heartstopper’s contemporary portrayal of LGBTQ+ youth brings to the genre. Already out and proud, Charlie (newcomer Joe Locke) instantly makes a nice change from the closeted narratives that dominate queer coming-of-age stories. We watch as the dorky teen folds himself to fit on a school bench with his buddies, Tao (Will Gao) and Issac (Tobie Donovan)—the latter often found with an Oseman book in hand—as the trio recount their morning spent ducking away from bullies and popular kids in the corridors of Truham Grammar School for Boys. This circle of friends, each coming up against their own struggles in their formative teenage years, also includes Elle (Yasmin Finney), a transgender student who has moved to the neighbouring all-girls school. When Charlie is allocated to his new form room, he’s seated beside Nick Nelson (Kit Connor), a rugby boy in the year above who radiates golden retriever energy. Timid greetings are exchanged between the two high schoolers, but Charlie is not interested in repressing his feelings (which appear as animated doodle butterflies that float across the screen). Across eight episodes, their friendship-turned-relationship is chronicled with considerate detail and heartwarming earnestness. Aimed at teenager viewers, with PG-rated love stares and awkward flirting, Heartstopper is a deeply wholesome portrait of navigating high school that’s devoid of booze, drugs, or sex. While this lack of edginess may dissuade some, the sweet romance that blossoms between Charlie and Nick, alongside the trials and tribulations of their friends, proves plenty engaging and never insubstantial. —Emily Maskell


3. The Marked Heart

marked-heart.jpg Netflix Release Date: April 20, 2022
Creator: Leonardo Padrón
Stars: Michel Brown, Ana Lucía Domínguez, Sebastián Martínez, Margarita Muñoz
Genre: Thriller
Rating: TV-MA

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This thriller from Colombia follows a man tracking down the organ-trafficking syndicate that murdered his wife. Things get complicated when he meets the woman who received her heart.


4. Anatomy of a Scandal

anatomy-scandal.jpg Netflix Release Date: April 15, 2022
Creators: David E. Kelley, Melissa James Gibson
Stars: Sienna Miller, Michelle Dockery, Rupert Friend, Naomi Scott, Josette Simon, Joshua McGuire
Genre: Drama, Thriller
Rating: TV-MA

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In many ways, Anatomy of a Scandal is the perfect Netflix show. It has the trappings of prestige (with an excellent cast and a well-known co-creator), it’s a quick binge (six episodes that never push close to the hour mark), and it might even have had something to say about an important issue if it weren’t so thinly drawn. Anatomy lets you congratulate yourself for watching something seemingly dark and provocative, but not something so dark or provocative that you can’t immediately forget it and move on with your day. The ultimate binge and purge. And that’s a shame, given what Anatomy of a Scandal could be. Instead, it’s a paint-by-numbers thriller that ostensibly investigates the nature of sexual consent without really making us feel invested in any of the characters involved, however well-acted. Based on Sarah Vaughan’s novel of the same name, and adapted by Melissa James Gibson and David E. Kelley, we mostly follow Sophie Whitehouse (Sienna Miller), whose world is thrown upside down when her handsome and successful politician husband, James (Rupert Friend), comes clean about an affair he’s had with a young assistant at work. Sophie is just starting to process this when another bombshell drops: The woman he had the affair with, Olivia (Naomi Scott), has accused James of rape. Anatomy of a Scandal first wants to say something about consent, maybe, but also dabbles in ideas of privilege. Not enough to really rile anyone’s feathers, but just enough to make you think briefly about the general injustice of it all. Despite the genuinely good cast, the easily bingeable formula, and enough breadcrumbs laid out to make it seem like it’s going somewhere interesting, the show ultimately just… exists. Pretty, rich people frown and fret and ultimately agree (save one) that justice in sexual assault cases is rarely served. Several characters deserved so much more. But the tenor of Anatomy of a Scandal is not tuned to that. It’s meant for everyone to nod together and sigh, and hit Play Next. —Allison Keene


5. Hard Cell

hard-cell.jpg Netflix Release Date: April 12, 2022
Creators: Catherine Tate
Stars: Catherine Tate, Christian Brassington, Donna Preston, Lorna Brown
Genre: Sitcom
Rating: TV-MA

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Creator and star Catherine Tate’s new British mockumentary sets up in a women’s prison. The Doctor Who alum plays several different characters, including the warden who’d rather put on an inmate-led performance of West Side Story than fix the prison’s actual problems.


6. Human Resources

human-resources.jpg Netflix Release Date: March 18, 2022
Creators: Jennifer Flackett, Andrew Goldberg, Nick Kroll, Kelly Galuska, Mark Levin
Stars: Aidy Bryant, Ali Wong, Pamela Adlon, Brandon Kyle Goodmanm, Keke Palmer, Hugh Jackman
Genre: Comedy
Rating: TV-MA

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The idea of personifying parts of the human experience, the urges and impulses that make us human, is a time-worn tradition; since time immemorial human beings have given living form to feelings, urges, and vibes, telling stories about gods and demons that convinced, helped, or tricked us into action. Netflix’s Big Mouth applied that concept to the experience of going through puberty, with the writers working out some of their past experiences through the lens of what they imagine it might be like for today’s youth. But new series Human Resources, a spinoff of Big Mouth, is both more mature and more emotional. It also mostly deals with the interior lives of adults. Created by Jennifer Flackett, Andrew Goldberg, Nick Kroll, Kelly Galuska, and Mark Levin, Human Resources (like its predecessor) focuses on the Hormone Monsters of Big Mouth who serve as the primary nonhuman guides. But here, their relationships with humans take a backseat to their relationships with each other. That also means that other nonhuman creatures like the Shame Wizard (voiced by David Thewlis) and Depression icon Kitty Dukakis (Maria Bamford) get the space to become more than just villains. Human Resources’ main protagonist is Emmy (Aidy Bryant), an alcoholic slacker assistant Lovebug who is thrust into the job of facilitating human affection and compassion after taking over for Becca (Ali Wong), the star client of Sonya (Pamela Adlon), one of the two Lovebugs that Big Mouth introduced in Big Mouth Season 5. The other returning Lovebug, Walter (Brandon Kyle Goodman), takes Emmy under his proverbial and literal wings while she competes with and tries to escape the shadow of her more successful friend and coworker, Rochelle (Keke Palmer), and navigate an unhealthy relationship with Dante the Addiction Angel (Hugh Jackman). Human Resources is surprisingly mature, but the show is also a riot for audience members interested in quick-fire bawdy comedy with a nice helping of intense cartoon violence thrown in. It can be really over the top, it’s incredibly blue, and it’s not for kids. Which of course means both that kids will watch it and that some adults will think it beneath them. —Kevin Fox, Jr.


7. Pieces of Her

pieces-of-her.jpg Netflix Release Date: March 4, 2022
Creator: Charlotte Stoudt
Stars: Sam Corlett, Leo Suter, Frida Gustavsson
Genre: Historical Drama
Rating: TV-MA

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The great thing about casting Toni Collette in your show is that no matter what else, Toni Collette is going to be very good. That’s true in the new eight-episode Netflix thriller Pieces of Her, adapted from the bestselling novel of the same name by Karin Slaughter, and Collette’s predictable excellence is the good news. The bad news is that most of the other elements are merely fine, such that there’s no great takeaway for viewers beyond “wow, Toni Collette!” and even that, repeated ad nauseam, becomes a kind of quiet damnation of everything else. The story begins with a mother and daughter eating lunch together one afternoon, and most of the conversation in the restaurant involves Laura Oliver (Collette) advising her aimless almost-30 daughter Andy (Bella Heathcoate) to see a therapist and/or get a job. They’re interrupted by a another mother/daughter pair, who are promptly murdered by a jilted ex-boyfriend, at which point Laura pulls off some extremely badass maneuvers to kill him, which confuses Andy because Laura is supposed to be just a regular mom and not Jason Bourne. It turns out that Laura has a past that goes a lot deeper than anyone knows, and the problem is that someone had his or her camera running when the dormant skills came out to play, and now she’s going viral. Laura very much does not want to go viral. So begins a mystery predicated on ghosts from the past refusing to stay in the past, and refusing to leave the actual ordinary citizens and husbands and daughters out of the game. Andy is forced to flee, Laura scrambles to evade what feels like a long-delayed destiny, and the plot spills out all across America in a disjointed road trip. None of it quite makes sense, and while none of it is explicitly terrible, it’s not captivating either. It has none of the shameless entertainment of a guilty pleasure like Prime Video’s Reacher, and none of the heart of HBO’s Mare of Easttown. What’s left then, is just a mild-mannered television product that has been written to fit into a genre, and then forgotten. Give me instead the bombastic failure, or the arty dud; there’s a good deal of freedom in the world of streaming, and risk has been rewarded like never before on TV. So why not swing a little harder? —Shane Ryan


8. The Guardians of Justice

guardians-justice.jpg Netflix Release Date: March 1, 2022
Creator:
Stars: Diamond Dallas Page, Sharni Vinson, RJ Mitte, Hal Ozsan, Christopher Judge, Jane Seymour, Denise Richards
Genre: Animation, Superhero
Rating: TV-MA

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The Guardians of Justice (Will Save You) is a pastiche and an homage: it’s action and comedy, it’s live-action and animated, it’s magnificent trash that is frenetic and, in the end, surprisingly thoughtful. It’s sharp but unclean, intentionally grimy and purposefully frayed to give the appearance and remembrance of old times and old technologies. Imagine if Turbo Kid was based on a mishmash of the Justice League and G.I. Joe instead of Mad Max, put it in a media scrambler with an ensemble cast and a huge team of animators, and allowed to stretch its legs across seven relatively brief episodes while producing the effect of a long-running franchise that had its many adaptations spliced together. The Guardians of Justice is set in an alternate universe version of 1987, 40 years after the appearance of a Superman-like figure that halted World War III started by a cyborg-resurrected Hitler. The show begins with Knight Hawk’s (Diamond Dallas Page) investigation of the apparent suicide by that Marvelous Man (Will Yun Lee). Knight Hawk suspects foul play, and soon casts suspicion upon fellow Guardians: The Speed (Sharni Vinson), Awesome Man (Derek Mears), Golden Goddess (Preeti Desai), Black Bow (Tiffany Hines), Blue-Scream (Jackson Rathbone), and King Tsunami (Kellen Lutz). Walker runs a global private military company concerned with economic stability and funded by the corporations whose logos have replaced stars on the U.S. flag, a sort of corporate robot army failsafe to prevent the nuclear war which seems imminent after Marvelous Man’s demise. It is a very stylized show, and some depictions are thin enough to be offensive, though one could charitably interpret this as implicit commentary on caricatures. Dr. Ravencroft (Jen-Kuo Sung Outerbridge) is the greatest example of this, as the most prominent character portrayed by an actor of East Asian descent, besides Marvelous Man, is a floating psychic leading a destructive sex cult. There are lots of monsters in the show, but this mystic pervert is the only one whose aesthetic comes across in a way that made me feel I’d have to warn people about racism. The Guardians of Justice makes no pretensions to being highbrow, which is part of why the ending came as such a welcome surprise that it positively colors the whole show. Regardless of whether the audience buys what the plot is selling, the artistic courage and visual creativity is worth the watch, provided viewers have a tolerance for intentional cheesiness and massive amounts of gore. —Kevin Fox, Jr.


9. Vikings: Valhalla

vikings-valhalla.jpg Netflix Release Date: Feb. 25, 2022
Creator: Jeb Stuart
Stars: Sam Corlett, Leo Suter, Frida Gustavsson
Genre: Historical Drama
Rating: TV-MA

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Created by Jeb Stuart (Die Hard, The Fugitive), the eight-episode Valhalla is the story of Leif Erikson (Sam Corlett) and his sister Freydis (Frida Gustavsson), mixed in with the conquest of King Canute (Bradley Freegard), the Dane who invaded England in 1015 and became king for almost 20 years. The story is exciting, though the history is, frankly, a mess—key events are conflated to make a tidy narrative, and figures like Erikson and Freydis are placed where they never seemed to have existed in real life. For one thing, Erikson is depicted as a young man during Canute’s conquest, sailing with the Danish king in order to save his sister’s life, when in fact he would have been just a few years from death at that point, and far away in Greenland. His sister Freydis, judging by the sagas, seems to have been a bit of a nightmare, with all of the murderousness that saw her father Erik the Red exiled over and over again, but here she’s devout and loyal (though equally fierce). For another, Canute’s voyage is portrayed as a revenge mission for the St. Brice’s Day Massacre, when the English king had Danish settlers put to death, but in fact his invasion came more than a decade after the fact. In other words, if you’re looking for an accurate retelling of some of the most consequential explorers and invaders in European history, look elsewhere. The writers have taken this first period of Norse historical illumination and cast it back into shadow, clearly more comfortable with the storytelling freedom given to them by the age of myth, when there are no facts to stumble over. History, for them, provides a nice outline for the story, and within that they feel free to pick and choose which elements work and which are omitted, and when to simply make something up entirely. But like its predecessor Vikings, Valhalla is a beautiful show, dark and gloomy and vicious, with all the adornments of warfare that make the Vikings so fascinating in the first place. The acting is occasionally over the-the-top in terms of emotional register, but within the context of a show that pursues historical bombast at each moment, it works. To view Vikings: Valhalla as targeting the spirit of the times rather than to-the-letter of the times is to enjoy on its own terms, and its own terms are ultimately fair. Maybe they keep the show from being truly great, but in terms of pure entertainment and getting you to click that “next episode” button, everything here works perfectly. Like Leif Erikson setting out in a viking longboat, sailing west from Greenland, finding solid ground is achievement enough. —Shane Ryan


10. The Cuphead Show

cuphead-show.jpg Netflix Release Date: Feb. 18, 2022
Creators: Chad Moldenhauer, Jared Moldenhauer
Stars: Tru Valentino, Frank Todaro, Joe Hanna, Luke Millington-Drake
Wayne Brady
Genre: Animation, Family
Rating: TV-Y7

Watch on Netflix

Last year, Netflix produced one of the most highly acclaimed videogame TV series to date, Arcane, based on the popular League of Legends franchise. Now, as the streamer continues to dig into a potent library of videogames for adaptation, they have teamed up with Studio MDHR to bring beloved run-and-gun action game, Cuphead, to life. The new animated series The Cuphead Show! presents an opportunity to expand upon the videogame and bring to life a stable of unique characters. Beyond the ability to build out the world, there is a much simpler reason that Cuphead made an ideal candidate to transition into a cartoon: its 1930s art style already borrows heavily from the animation of a bygone era. The Cuphead Show has the tall task of innovating rather than being an empty homage, and it doesn’t often hit the mark—at least in terms of its story. Our heroic twosome Cuphead (Tru Valentino) and Mugman (Frank Todaro) are heavily influenced by traditional comedy duos, and their mannerisms and sensibilities have been repeated throughout countless cartoons from Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck to Ren & Stimpy: Cuphead is the troublemaker, while Mugman is more reserved and hesitant. Many of the antics the boys get up to involve their behavior and not upsetting their guardian, Elder Kettle (Joe Hanna). Over the course of the 12-episode first season, Cuphead and Mugman get into numerous dilemmas with predictable results. The Cuphead Show never engages with the racist history of the art form—animation in this era commonly used racial stereotypes for easy laughs. And, even though the show is visually entertaining, it can still be a chore to watch; by focusing on a story so heavily influenced on the past, The Cuphead Show hasn’t really moved the needle into creating something new. It’s also hindered in trying to wear multiple hats by being family-oriented and also appealing to adults who admired the video game. There’s an abundance of talent and passion involved in the creation of The Cuphead Show, but ultimately it doesn’t innovate on its inspirations. Instead, it ends up being a homage where the sole novelty comes from seeing these videogame characters recreated in 1930s-era shorts. For game veterans, the narrative slog might be worth making to see these memorable villains come to life, but families would probably be best suited looking elsewhere. The Cuphead Show is a product of its bygone era, offering few jollies outside of its initial novelty. —Max Covill

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11. Young Wallander

young-wallander.jpg Netflix Release Date: Feb. 17, 2022
Creator: Ben Harris
Stars: Adam Pålsson, Richard Dillane, Josef Hemberg, Leanne Best, Ellise Chappell
Genre: Thriller
Rating: TV-MA

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The first thing you notice about the new Netflix series Young Wallander is the glaring identity crisis. The original Kurt Wallander, as depicted in the popular novels of Henning Mankell, is a gloomy Swedish police inspector in the coastal town of Ystad, brilliant but beset by depression, anger, alcoholism, various family disasters, and, just for good measure, diabetes and Alzheimer’s. The books were first adapted as a series of movies in Sweden, then as a Swedish TV show, and in 2008 the character gained a larger foothold in the U.K. and eventually America with the excellent BBC adaptation starring the rumpled, melancholic Kenneth Brannagh. In that show, the creators made the choice to keep the original Ystad setting (and filmed most of the show in Ystad itself, sometimes overlapping with the ongoing Swedish series), but wisely let all the actors use their normal British accents. Comparatively, Young Wallander is a bit of a strange fish. It’s still the same character, still set in Sweden (in Malmo, the closest big city to Ystad), but it’s shot in Lithuania. Most of the cast are British, and speak with British accents, but there’s one very jarring exception in Young Wallander himself, played by Adam Palsson: a Swedish actor speaking English with a Swedish accent. They’ve used the idea of Wallander, but made him younger, transported him to a city, transported him to the present day, jettisoned the Nordic Noir elements, and retained very few of the biographical details present in the novels or other TV adaptations. So why not just make a new show? Within about ten minutes of the pilot, I began to suspect that the concept of “Wallander” was only there to build a bridge to a well-known, successful detective franchise, but that was otherwise unrelated. Which was a red flag, signaling that the material wasn’t strong enough on its own without grasping desperately for a familiar lifeline. With only a flimsy, confusing connection to the source material, it put huge pressure on the show’s other elements to carry the water. As for those other elements—plotting, performance, atmosphere—I rate them between “fine” and “slightly dull.” After two hours, there’s not much here to engage, and not much reason to plow ahead. For some diehard viewers, of which I am one, it is difficult to produce a Swedish detective show that doesn’t appeal on some level, and Young Wallander isn’t so mediocre that it can be tossed completely aside. But with an underwhelming leading man, a muddled identity, and a cliched story, it’s ultimately insubstantial. —Shane Ryan


12. Inventing Anna

inventing-anna.jpg Netflix Release Date: Feb. 11, 2022
Creator: Shonda Rhimes
Stars: Anna Chlumsky, Julia Garner, Arian Moayed, Anders Holm, Laverne Cox
Genre: Drama
Rating: TV-MA

Watch on Netflix

In the late 2010s, a young woman going by the name of Anna Delvey effortlessly conned New York’s rich and powerful into believing she was a German heiress, defrauding both people and institutions out of vast sums of money to support her lavish lifestyle. In 2019 she was found guilty and sent to prison, but by then—thanks in large part to a New York Magazine article by Jessica Pressler detailing the case and the mysterious woman behind it—Anna was a star. Netflix’s new nine-episode miniseries comes from Shonda Rhimes, and is the perfect Shondaland series in that it is incredibly fun to watch but filled with issues. The first is star Julia Garner’s divisive accent. If you can get past that, though, Inventing Anna is undeniably engrossing. Anna remains an inscrutable figure throughout, one referred to as both a scared girl and Hannibal Lecter. By all accounts, both are true. It’s also delightful to see frivolously rich people get played by someone who uses their own tricks and mores against them. Anna was able to so easily move to the pinnacle of New York society because she understood that by flashing money and posturing as wealthy and unbothered, doors would open. They did. The story lays bare a damning portrait of a shallow and money-obsessed culture of elites (and those who leech off of them), while also making us wish that we were a part of it. Who is Anna Delvey? An heiress? A folk hero? A con woman? A girl with a dream? An aspiration? An inspiration? Perhaps Anna Delvey is, and was, whoever you need her to be. —Allison Keene